Matilda Wren

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Lets Meet

Science Fiction and Fantasy Author W.H. Cann is with us today on the ‘Lets Meet’ segment. He has two published titles under his belt, ‘Path to Vengeance’ and ‘Sorcerers Duel’. He has had a passion for reading from a very young age, but his interest has always lay in fantasy and science fiction when his father gave him some Conan books by Robert E. Howard and the series Thongor of Lemuria by Lin Carter, and of course the arrival of Star Wars. He has loved reading ever since.


“A rather entertaining read.”
4 star Amazon Review for ‘Path to Vengeance’


“This novel has a big sucker punch of emotion concealed within its pages.”
5 star Amazon Review for ‘Sorcerers Duel’


Today, we chat about W.H. Cann’s path to becoming an author, his decision to self-publish and his preference for Ebooks or Paperbacks.

MW: Hello and Welcome!

What is your genre? Why did you choose it?

WHC: I write in two genres, Science Fiction and Fantasy, although strictly speaking, my Science Fiction series had developed more of a fantasy feel during the re-writing. Fantasy is my preferred of the two and has been since I started reading adult fiction. The first fantasy novel I recall reading was Conan when I was about nine, and was hooked from that moment. There’s something amazing about the whole Fantasy genre, one where the boundaries of creation are limited only by one’s imagination. However, I first began writing in the Science Fiction genre, mainly because of my fascination with the Star Wars Universe, which is from where my first idea sprang, but my thoughts on this genre are similar to that of Fantasy.

MW: Tell us about your path to becoming an author. Did you have any idea at the start what the process really entails?

WHC: Not when I first began writing, not that I considered this option back then. It was only when I first finished the series in 2001 did I start to appreciate what was entailed in attempting to become a published author. Now I have an even greater appreciation, although my recent experience is only really in epublising.

MW: How long did it take for your first book to go from an idea to a published work?

WHC: It actually took 14 years. I first put pen to paper in 1998 after injuring my back. I thought I would ‘have a go’ at writing a story, just to see how far I could go and to pass the long days at home when there was little else to do. I did not expect to end up writing what eventually became an epic story of in excess of a thousand pages, split into three long volumes. I finished them in 2001, and did seek an agent, but after a couple of rejections and further consideration, I decided I was unhappy about the finished work, believing it needed rewriting. So, I put the science fiction series aside and set about writing a fantasy novel, intending to go back to the Science Fiction series at a later date. Due to work and family pressures, I temporarily put aside my writing in 1995, but recommenced in 2011, and continued with the 3rd volume in my Fantasy series. I had the good fortune of meeting another author, who was also an editor and reviewer, to whom I gave the first volumes of both my Science Fiction and Fantasy series. After receiving her recommendations, I returned to the Science Fiction series and set about rewriting it. Six months later, book 1 was published.

MW: Do you work on more than one manuscript at a time?

WHC: Yes. My first draft is always written by hand using a fountain pen and lined A4 pads. I then type this onto the PC, building on the first draft and expanding the whole story. While typing the one, I will commence writing the next, or even take a few days break from one to work on another. This is not something I have done recently, mainly because I have been focusing on completing the first 3 books my Science Fiction series.

MW: If the movie rights to your novels are purchased, how involved would you want to be in the process of bringing those stories to life on the screen?

WHC: I would like to very involved. I have seen many films which do not always do the book justice, although I appreciate this is not always possible. An author has specific perceptions about the characters and how they interact, which is not always appreciated by those who produce films, sometimes making erroneous choices in casting actors.

MW: I love my kindle and believe it is a marvellous invention. However it doesn’t quite replace my love for the printed book; the smell, the feel of the pages, even better if it is an ear chewed second hand version! Do you have a preference for e-book formats or the traditional paper and hardback versions?

WHC: I agree wholeheartedly with your point of view. I do have a Kindle, which was purchased primarily for reviewing my own books, but I have obtained many of the classics and other widely available novels that are free, plus many by recent indie authors. I still prefer to hold and read printed books, and where possible, hardback editions; you cannot beat the feel and smell of a printed book.

MW: Are you the type of person that constantly carries around a notepad to jot down ideas or are you more in the technical age and use a dictaphone or other sound recording devices?

WHC: No. In my early days, I would think and plan the way my stories progressed while driving or walking, and then if necessary, jot down notes when I returned home. I have recently started keeping a notebook in the car just in case an idea springs to mind.

MW: Do you create an outline before beginning a new book?

WHC: When an idea first springs to mind, I only jot down the basics. I develop the idea as I begin writing, and as the story grows, I add notes and pointers to the outline. This way I can ensure continuity of characters and flow of events. I never really know where my stories will take me, and I love to see how my characters develop as events unfold. I like to keep things fluid to allow the characters to develop and grow as events affect their lives, and their actions impact on those events and people around them. The crucial element in my stories is continuity of time, especially where space-travel is concerned, making sure events occur in the right sequence, which I achieve by keeping a timeline.

MW: Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us today!


Visit W.H. Cann’s website at: www.whcann.co.uk

Follow him on Twitter: @wh_Cann

EBook Editions: Path to Vengeance:

Amazon UK
Amazon US
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Diesel

EBook Editions: Sorcerer’s Duel:

Amazon UK
Amazon US
Smashwords
Barnes and Noble
Diesel

Paperback Editions: Path to Vengeance:

Amazon UK
Amazon US
Createspace

Paperback Editions: Sorcerer’s Duel:

Amazon UK
Amazon US
Createspace